100WomenStrong Now Accepting Letters of Intent for 2019 Grant Funding consideration

100WomenStrong Now Accepting Letters of Intent for 2019 Grant Funding consideration

 100WomenStrong, a group of concerned philanthropists seeking to strategically invest in organizations and programs that enrich the lives of Loudoun County residents, will begin accepting Letters of Intent from area nonprofits on October 1 for 2019 grants. Organizations that are headquartered or operate in Loudoun County and wish to receive 2019 grant funds from 100WomenStrong for programs in the areas of health, hunger, education and shelter, must file a preliminary Letter of Intent between 7 a.m. on Monday, October 1, 2018, and 5 p.m. on Friday, November 1, 2018. According to 100WomenStrong member Stephanie Place, Letters of Intent should be no more than one page long, should be in 11-point font or larger and should include: Name and purpose of nonprofit organization – must be based in or have programs in Loudoun County Dollar amount of grant request What the money will fund – outline how you would utilize the grant money Why this project(s) is important to those you serve and to Loudoun County and its residents Letters should be emailed to LettersofIntent@onehundredwomenstrong.org as a .pdf attachment with the name of the organization in the subject line of the email. Every applicant will receive an email confirming receipt of the Letter of Intent. If an email confirmation is not received, double check to ensure that your email was addressed correctly. Nonprofits who submit a Letter of Intent will be notified of the status of their applications on or before 12/14/2018. Only those nonprofits invited to apply will be requested to submit a full grant proposal by January 18, 2019. Visit http://www.onehundredwomenstrong.org/grants/application-process/ to learn more. Questions about the grant process can be directed...
Join Us: Philanthropy Summit 2018

Join Us: Philanthropy Summit 2018

Join us on October 18, 2018 for a series of conversations with needs and solutions in mind. Learn more from our nonprofit and human service leaders as we explore our community’s roadmap to behavioral health, teen wellness, and substance abuse. Be a part of the dialogue about why philanthropy matters, and how we can work together to strengthen our community. Summit Details Date:  October 18, 2018 Time:  9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Location:  Loudoun County Public Schools Administration Building, 21000 Education Court, Ashburn, VA 20148 Registration:  There is no cost to attend; however, registration required.  Register Here Summit Preview Registration 9:00 to 9:30. Program 9:30 to 1:00. Census 2020: Gary Bass, Executive Director of the Bauman Foundation, will kick off our morning with an overview of the importance and challenges of a fair and accurate count during the 2020 Census, and collaborative strategies to overcome those hurdles. Teen Wellness: Suzy Bartel of the Ryan Bartel Foundation will introduce us to practitioners who aid teens in our community. Panelists include Dr. John Walker (Loudoun County Department of Family Services), Tom Sweitzer (A Place to Be), and Jennifer Wall (Loudoun County Public Schools). Substance Abuse:Stacey Metcalfe of Inova Health System will moderate a panel discussion focusing on trends and resources in our community to address substance abuse. Panelists include: Dan Luczak (Loudoun Club 12), Amy Paratore (HCA StoneSprings Hospital Center), and Jim Freeman (Loudoun County Community Corrections). Behavioral Health: Carol Jameson of HealthWorks for Northern Virginia will help us understand some of the behavioral health services in our community. Panelists include: Joey Coburn (Friends of Loudoun Mental Health), Michelle Mullany (Inova Health System), and Margaret...
Philanthropy Loses.  Again.

Philanthropy Loses. Again.

Last week’s Washington Post Headline caught my eye—as it must for every other U.S. tax payer, “New estimate: GOP’s second tax cuts would add $3.8 trillion to deficit.” Regardless of your views on politics, tax cuts, and deficits, this newly proposed legislation further erodes incentives for one of America’s most bipartisan and long-held values: charity. As many Loudoun County residents know, we face some of the most lackluster charitable giving rates in the U.S.  Blinded by the fresh paint on the homes and businesses in one of the fastest growing and high-income counties in America, our residents don’t see the need that is, in fact, here. But, this is larger than what we face here in our community. Take, for instance, the estate tax: one of the most pro-social engines to establish legacy gifts in the U.S. Newly proposed legislation offers even deeper cuts to the estate tax paid by only 5,000 of the wealthiest families in America. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ratified in December 2017 made the first changes to how Americans report their charitable gifts.  Philanthropic researchers at Philanthropy Outlook have scoured existing data to anticipate how these new laws may affect charitable giving.  Consider that, in years prior, 30% of U.S. households itemized their taxes, providing a vehicle to reduce taxes liability with each charitable gift reported. With the new standard deduction rules beginning in 2018, the number of households that will qualify for itemization is expected to be reduced to 5% from 12.5%.  It will be the larger income earners in our nation who continue to have the option to itemize. And, if...
Donor Advised Funds:  Teaching a tradition of giving from one generation to the next

Donor Advised Funds: Teaching a tradition of giving from one generation to the next

In our backyard, there are two families who are likely to never meet.  The first just lost the transmission in their car and depend upon three jobs to make ends meet. Thankfully, there are a number of nonprofit organizations that will help them stretch their dollars until they are back on the feet.  The other family has been fortunate here in Loudoun County. They are eager to give back. As President/CEO of the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties, my job brings me into contact with both. We often say that our work is to “connect donors who care with causes that matter.” It is what inspires our FacesofLoudoun.org community service campaign. It is what makes Loudoun County such a great place to grow up and grow old. We have a number of fund “instruments” to help our donors fulfill their charitable vision.  One of the most well-known, donor advised funds or DAFs, are a philanthropic tool used by many different entities.  In our organization, they play an important role in our community. The fact is, over our 19 years serving Loudoun County, we have developed deep expertise in our nonprofit landscape and keen understanding of our community’s needs. DAFs allow us to work directly with caring individuals who seek to philanthropically invest in our community to ensure their gifts achieve the greatest good. Donor advised funds are very nimble and flexible. This is critical when a crisis hits or unexpected opportunities arise: whether it’s advancing a newly identified need or responding to a natural disaster.  What’s more, DAFs are actively invested alongside our community endowments allowing...
Mark Your Calendar: Nonprofit Academy, Philanthropy Summit, and More

Mark Your Calendar: Nonprofit Academy, Philanthropy Summit, and More

As summer comes to an end, the Community Foundation is busy planning and preparing our fall programs.  Don’t forget to mark your calendar and register for our upcoming events!   Nonprofit Academy  The Human Element to Business Development Tuesday, September 11, 2018 9:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Leesburg Junction Register Here Pam Jones, of Extraordinary Transitions – Long & Foster, will facilitate a two-part discussion during this workshop that will begin with focusing on Communication Skills and Secrets and will conclude with an Evaluation Plan of Results.   Building a Wills & Bequests Program for Your Nonprofit Thursday, October 25, 2018 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Leesburg Junction Register Here Amy Owen, President and CEO of Community Foundation, will guide you through building a Wills and Bequest program.  Explore ways you can build a program that will attract your donors to your mission with a final gift, often of high impact and generosity. (New to the Nonprofit Academy?  Learn more here.)   2018 Philanthropy Summit Thursday, October 18, 2018 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Loudoun County Public Schools Administration Building RSVP Here Join us for a series of conversations with needs and solutions in mind. Learn more from our nonprofit and human service leaders as we explore our community’s roadmap to behavioral health, teen wellness, and substance abuse. Be a part of the dialogue about why philanthropy matters, and how we can work together to strengthen our community.   Other Noteworthy and Upcoming Events Making Sense of Today’s Economy and Investing Tuesday, September 11, 2018 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Register Here Estate planning professionals:  join the Loudoun Estate Planning...
Have You Met our New Faces Yet?

Have You Met our New Faces Yet?

Faces of Loudoun has some new neighbors for you to meet – and new community needs to learn more about.   Have you met Keely?  Keely’s perseverance as a mom, coupled with help from a Loudoun nonprofit speech and hearing center, helped her child get the care that he needed to live a happy, healthy life.   Have you met Amado?  Amado’s resilience, coupled with help from a Loudoun food pantry and community health center, helped him maintain a healthy, sober life after his recovery from alcohol addiction.   Have you met Carol?  Carol’s passion for making change in our community, coupled with her expertise and leadership skills, help her lead one of Loudoun County’s safety net organizations providing health care to Loudoun residents.   What is Faces of Loudoun? Working with leaders from varied backgrounds (educators, grantmakers, grant seekers, faith based, government, and business) the Community Foundation has zeroed in on a missing ingredient in Loudoun County:  a strong sense of charitable giving and philanthropy.  The Faces of Loudoun is a community service campaign sharing true stories of our neighbors in need to help increase local knowledge, spark increased charitable giving, and promote volunteerism. Don’t miss out on our new stories – follow us on Facebook. Check out more stories at:  http://www.facesofloudoun.org....
Scholarship Fund Created in Memory of Loudoun County Supervisor Henry Stowers

Scholarship Fund Created in Memory of Loudoun County Supervisor Henry Stowers

The Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties (CF) is honored to announced that a newly gifted scholarship fund has been created to benefit graduates of Loudoun County High School (LCHS). Henry C. Stowers’s estate created the Loudoun County High School Scholarship Fund with a $665,000 endowment and will make an annual award of approximately $20,000 per year to four students. The award will be renewable for four years for a potential of $20,000 in total support to each LCHS graduate recipient. The first scholarship was awarded to Danning Bisaga, a 2018 graduate of LCHS who plans to attend the University of Virginia this fall and pursue her interest in studying psychiatry or psychology.  “This is a wonderful opportunity. Thank you,” stated Bisaga. “This fund is a substantial gift to Loudoun County. We are honored to have been chosen to steward its growth to ensure hundreds of graduates of Loudoun County High School benefit from this incredibly generous gift,” said Amy Owen, president of the Community Foundation. “By all accounts, Henry was a very kind soul who was a ‘giver, not a taker.’ This scholarship fund is an example of his spirit of giving.” Stowers was a lifelong farmer and an avid photographer. He served on the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors from 1972 to 1979 and on the Loudoun County Soil and Water Conservation District from 1980 to 1986. He also held leadership positions in many Loudoun County and regional organizations, including service on the boards of the Loudoun County Farm Bureau, the Southern States Cooperative, the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Committee, and the Planters’ Club. He...
Loudoun Impact Fund:  Tips for Grant Seekers

Loudoun Impact Fund: Tips for Grant Seekers

Calling grant seekers!  Does your organization serve low income, at-risk, or special needs youth, older adults, or people with disabilities?  The Loudoun Impact Fund, a partnership between the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties and Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, is currently accepting proposals for programs that advance youth and elderly welfare, and services for people with disabilities. The Loudoun Impact Fund is a giving circle of annual philanthropic investors who review and recommend grants into our Loudoun community. Each year, members of the giving circle  select their top priorities for grantmaking in Loudoun. We request proposals for funding that will positively impact the priorities they selected; you submit a carefully prepared application, requesting funding for your good work. So, you wonder, what might nudge your application to be selected as one of the top-ranked proposals?   Here are our tips to help your proposal stand out: The details matter. Carefully reviewing your narrative and budget to ensure you completely answer each question in the application requirements is an important step to make sure the reviewers have all the information they need. But, keep it simple.  The art of crafting detailed yet concise messaging related to your organization’s work comes with practice and careful editing.  It’s tempting to wax poetic about your proposed project or program; after all, your organization is doing great things, and probably a lot of them!  But keep in mind the reviewers are reading many proposals.  You want yours to be easily digested and understood. Avoid assuming. Remember, our reviewers may not be familiar with your organization, even if your organization is a previous...
Did You Hear the News? New Leadership Here…

Did You Hear the News? New Leadership Here…

Two new leaders have taken on the Community Foundation mantle.  Nicole Acosta adds her knowledge and background in a new staffed position, Director of Grants and Nonprofit Programs.  Lucky Wadehra joins the leadership team as a newest Board of Director. Acosta will serve as the first contact point for donors interested in grantmaking, among other duties. Acosta will work closely with Amy Owen, president of the Community Foundation and will provide direct support for donor advised funds and giving circles such as 100WomenStrong and the Loudoun Impact Fund, for which she will work directly with donors to ensure a quality experience, focusing on continuous improvement. As the Director of Nonprofit Programs & Grants, Acosta will help guide strategic leadership initiatives within the Community Foundation, as well as directly oversee and direct media outreach and communications and training programs for area nonprofit leaders and organizations. Wadehra, an Ashburn resident, is a Senior Vice President and Business Banking Manager for Wells Fargo’s Business Banking Group in Northern Virginia. Lucky has been with Wells Fargo and in banking and lived in Loudoun County for more than 15 years. Throughout her career, she has held positions in leadership and management roles requiring a strong skill set in customer service, sales, budgeting, financial and business acumen, developing talent and practicing diversity and inclusion. She joins the Board for a  three-year term bringing her seasoned business sense to the Community Foundation’s structure and vision. We welcome them...
Loudoun County Giving: the 2017 Data is In

Loudoun County Giving: the 2017 Data is In

For a second year, research conducted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy to measure charitable giving reveals lackluster household giving in Loudoun County. While most of Loudoun’s neighboring counties reported an increase in giving between the study’s release first in 2014 and again in 2017, Loudoun County giving rates have remained flat. The study, “How America Gives,” offers an analysis of the giving patterns of Americans who earn $50,000 or more annually and who itemize charitable deductions on their income-tax returns for 2012 and 2015. Itemized giving of these taxpayers represents nearly 80 percent of all individual charitable contributions and offers the best comparison into giving at local levels and includes giving to places of worship and nonprofits serving education, health, animal welfare, etc. The key measure is the giving ratio: This is the total of a locality’s charitable contributions as a share of its total adjusted gross income. For instance, if itemizing taxpayers in a given area earned on average $100,000 and gave away $3,000, that area’s giving ratio would be 3 percent. If Loudoun County’s giving were equal to the giving rate of Virginia’s overall giving ratio of 2.9%, it would generate and additional $155,000,000 for charity. The first study released in 2014, became part of a stable of research and information that informed the Community Foundation for Loudoun and Northern Fauquier Counties’ Faces of Loudoun campaign and supported by the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers. The campaign portrays real people in Loudoun County who have relied on the services of local nonprofits addressing homelessness, aging in place, intellectual and mental disabilities, domestic violence, health, addiction, teen suicide,...